Go to page

Bibliographic Metadata

Restriction-Information
 The document is publicly available on the WWW.
Links
Abstract

Introduction Perinatal data of women with a Vietnamese migration background have not been systematically studied in Germany to date. Numerous details of important maternal and child outcomes were compared and analysed. The study's primary parameters were the frequency of and indication for c-section. Methodology The perinatal data from a Berlin hospital were analysed retrospectively. The women (Vietnamese migration background vs. autochthonous) were grouped using name analysis. Datasets of 3002 women giving birth, including 999 women with a Vietnamese migration background, were included. The associations between primary or secondary cesarean delivery and different child outcomes depending on the migration background (exposure) were studied using logistical regression analysis. Results Women with a Vietnamese migration background have a lower c-section rate of 8.0% for primary and 12.6% for secondary c-section than women without a migration background (11.1% primary and 16.4% secondary c-section respectively). Regression analysis shows that the odds that women with a Vietnamese migration background will have a primary (OR 0.75; p = 0.0884) or secondary c-section (OR 0.82; p = 0.1137) are not significantly lower. A Vietnamese migration background was associated with higher odds for an episiotomy but not for a grade 3-4 perineal tear. A Vietnamese migration background does not have a significant influence on poor 5-min Apgar scores <= 7 and low umbilical cord arterial pH values <= 7.10. Newborns of mothers with a Vietnamese migration background have higher odds of a relatively higher birth weight (> 3110 g). Summary There was no evidence that women with a Vietnamese migration background are delivered more often by caesarean section. There were also no differences as regards important child outcome data from women in the comparator group. Overall, the results do not provide any evidence for poorer quality of care of women with a Vietnamese migration background in Berlin despite the cultural and communication barriers in the reality of care provision.

Stats